pupukachoo:

froggy-horntail:

pantheonbooks:

duamuteffe:

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

9 is worth the price of admission, holy crap.

This is genius. So many great writing tips!

And this is why Pixar is a master in their field.

Why do I feel so weird reblogging this… this is the weekend dammit!  Anyway, great advice.

pupukachoo:

froggy-horntail:

pantheonbooks:

duamuteffe:

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

9 is worth the price of admission, holy crap.

This is genius. So many great writing tips!

And this is why Pixar is a master in their field.

Why do I feel so weird reblogging this… this is the weekend dammit!  Anyway, great advice.

(via godoflaundrybaskets)

"When I discover a bad assonance or a repetition in one of my phrases, I am sure that I am floundering in error; by dint of searching, I find the exact expression which was the only one and is, at the same time, the harmonious one. The word is never lacking when one possesses the idea."

Gustave Flaubert

(Source: advicetowriters.com)

"Behind the complicated details of the world stand the simplicities: God is good, the grown-up man or woman knows the answer to every question, there is such a thing as truth, and justice is as measured and faultless as a clock. Our heroes are simple: they are brave, they tell the truth, they are good swordsmen and they are never in the long run really defeated. That is why no later books satisfy us like those which were read to us in childhood—for those promised a world of great simplicity of which we knew the rules, but the later books are complicated and contradictory with experience; they are formed out of our own disappointing memories."

Graham Greene

(Source: advicetowriters.com)

"What lasts in the reader’s mind is not the phrase but the effect the phrase created: laughter, tears, pain, joy. If the phrase is not affecting the reader, what’s it doing there? Make it do its job or cut it without mercy or remorse."

Isaac Asimov

(Source: advicetowriters.com)

"Every story would be another story, and unrecognizable if it took up its characters and plot and happened somewhere else. Fiction depends for its life on place. Place is the crossroads of circumstance, the proving ground of, What happened? Who’s here? Who’s coming?"

Eudora Welty

(Source: advicetowriters.com)

"Dialogue that is written in dialect is very tiring to read. If you can do it brilliantly, fine. If other writers read your work and rave about your use of dialect, go for it. But be positive that you do it well, because otherwise it is a lot of work to read short stories or novels that are written in dialect. It makes our necks feel funny."

Anne Lamott

(Source: advicetowriters.com)

"The curse of all successful writers is the dream of all Americans: owning a house. Houses have ruined a lot of literary artists, more so than drugs or drink. Jack London built himself a palace and then committed suicide. Mark Twain almost went bust maintaining his Connecticut digs. …If I had one piece of advice to give to aspirant writers it would be: Don’t—don’t, don’t, don’t—under any circumstances buy a house you could not afford if you were a plumber’s assistant. Or, as a veteran Hollywood agent told me not long ago: Put your money in the bank; if you buy anything, pay cash, and if you can’t pay cash, don’t buy it."

Philip Caputo

(Source: advicetowriters.com)

"I believe in the democracy of storytelling. I love the fact that our stories can cross all sorts of borders and boundaries. I feel humbled by the notion that I’m even a small part of the literary experience. I grew up in a house, in a city, in a country shaped by books. I don’t know of a greater privilege than being allowed to tell a story, or to listen to a story. They’re the only thing we have that can trump life itself."

Colum McCann

(Source: advicetowriters.com)

"My block was due to two overlapping factors: laziness and lack of discipline. If you really want to write, then shut yourself in a room, close the door, and WRITE. If you don’t want to write, do something else. It’s as simple as that."

Mary Garden

(Source: advicetowriters.com)

"In conversations over the years with other writers and artists, about what we’re actually supposed to be doing, I’ve been struck by how often, deep down, the talk becomes a quest for the same mysterious thing. Underneath the particular image in question, the particular short story or musical composition, we’re looking for a source of hope. When a conversation about each other’s work doesn’t pivot on professional jargon or drift toward the logistics of career management, when it’s instead deferential and accommodating, we’re sometimes able to locate a kind of Rosetta stone, a key to living well with the vexing and intractable nature of human life. If any wisdom emerges in these conversations, it offers sudden clarification. It’s the Grail shimmer. You feel it, and you can’t wait to get to work."

Barry Lopez

(Source: advicetowriters.com)


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